visual art

Summer Road Trip Series: Dali Museum, St. Petersburg, Florida

Summer Road Trip Series: Dali Museum, St. Petersburg, Florida

Introducing the Summer Road Trip Series! In addition to bringing you research and reviews from the art’s management and technology world, over the next few months the AMT-Lab team will be sharing stories of their interactions with art and technology from their travels over the summer. We hope our travels will inspire you to visit a new place on your summer vacation or spark a new idea to try out in your own institution!

Research Update: Artworks Powered by Artificial Intelligence in the Marketplace

There is a significant distinction to be made between the traditional model of AI-generation - where an algorithm simply produces a piece of art - and a more interactive form of generation, where the algorithm is actually part of the art. The question then becomes, how can artwork that requires ongoing AI generation and adaptation can be integrated into the traditional marketplace?

Image source: Philip Beesley Architect Inc.

Uninterrupted Research: Advancing the Digitization of Archives

Uninterrupted Research: Advancing the Digitization of Archives

Art historical research became more scientific with the accessibility of photography, documenting specific features of work and facilitating visual archiving along with the written word. Storing these elements together provides researches with a more complete vision of the narrative overtime.

Camera Precision: How ARTMYN Leverages Digitization for Engagement

Camera Precision: How ARTMYN Leverages Digitization for Engagement

Cataloging is one of the most labor intensive responsibilities for collections management, requiring the expertise of many art-specialists. It typically is also the most encountered feature of a collection, especially when the actual object is restricted with respect to: preservation, accessibility, and engagement. Digitizing collections challenges traditional paradigms for audience interaction,  and one private organization leading the progression is ARTMYN.

#TBT: The Web-Based Arts Experience

#TBT: The Web-Based Arts Experience

When discussing the future of the arts, many professionals and studies have stated that the manner in which audiences consume arts and culture is rapidly changing--and has already changed.  The Internet has been the most notable new space for consuming culture, providing both opportunities and challenges through widespread and instant information sharing. Over the past several years, AMT Lab has documented the various web-based arts experiences that are becoming readily available--usually including lessons and best practices that managers can take away for their own practice.  This week’s TBT rounds them up into a user-friendly toolbox of online arts experiences of various artistic mediums.

#TBT: Highlighting New Media Art

#TBT: Highlighting New Media Art

While technology and art combine frequently to facilitate the practices of arts managers, they are simultaneously blending to create a whole new artform--new media art.  All bets are off with this medium, as an array of tools, approaches and capabilities make it impossible to label as either visual or performance; in many cases, the art goes even farther and provides a social benefit to those who experience it.  This week’s TBT provides managers with a roundup of the research we’ve done so far to start piecing together a picture of what new media art means for the future of management in all types of arts venues and forums.

What do you think about your ticketing software?

What do you think about your ticketing software?

We are conducting the 3rd National Ticketing Software Survey during the month of February.  If you are interested in sharing your experience and your opinions about your software, please let us know. All those participating in the survey will receive a full copy of the report which will provide a national view as well as cluster analyses by discipline, budget size, and geographic region. The data will be useful for both organizations and vendors.  Organizations will gain a better understanding of their own practices as compared to their peers and, more importantly, be able to use the findings as evidence for future technology funding campaigns.  Vendors will have explicit evidence as to the needs and wants for future software design.

If Van Gogh Had Google Glass...

Google Glasses

According to Google executives, Google Glass, a new type of high tech glasses, will be released to the public at the end of this year. By bringing heads up display-style views into our daily life, Google’s Glass project will enable users to interact simultaneously with their surroundings and the internet in a dynamic and instant way. An engineer who had the opportunity to try out the Google Glass released a video showcasing how she will use Google Glass in the future:

[embed width="560" height="315"]http://youtu.be/9c6W4CCU9M4[/embed]

The tech giant has set up a competition on Twitter and Google+ to explore potential ways to use the new product and give some lucky winners the shot at owning a pair of Google's glasses. "We're looking for bold, creative individuals who want to join us and be a part of shaping the future of Glass" writes Google. If you don’t think Google Glass will impact Arts Management, you sure might after reading the following 10 interesting ideas posted @Twitter #ifihadglass :

  • I would use it to show people how I make it through life and do to work on my art,missing my right arm.
  • I'd treat the world as my canvas; I'd share the art that is the human experience, and rejoice in music, travel, life and love!
  • I would record the process start to finish as I make new pieces of art.
  • I would show the galleries and art exhibits for others to see the art if they don’t have time, and the art scene in San Francisco.
  • I'd give free guides to tourists explaining the history and meaning of obscure pieces of art.
  • I would like to use google glass in Art museums to pull up all information and references for each artwork I viewed
  • I would be excited to test potential uses for museums, immersive experiences and digital learning about art, culture, history.
  • Analytics and Art. Figuring out what parts of the day my brain drops from memory, where its focusing, and why.
  • Explore the combination of the virtual and the real through performance art. Collaborate with fellow artists through what I see.
  • If I had glass, I would redesign the way that we shoot videos and take photography, helping viewers immerse themselves in art.

One of the most amazing impacts of Google Glass would be that Google Glass  has the ability to offer a new perspective for audiences to appreciate art—from an artist’s perspective. Google Glass enables an artist to record and show the whole process of making an artwork, offering opportunities for audiences to watch every minute change the artist makes in the work. Imagine if Van Gogh had recorded his process from start to finish when he was painting "Sunflower," how amazing it would be if his audience saw how he mixed colors, sketched on canvas, drew lines, or grabbed a painting brush. Everyone is likely to think as an artist if he/she could watch the birth of an artwork from an artist’s eye. I believe that by appreciating artworks from an artist’s perspective, audiences will be moved and surprised by details that cannot be seen from the final artwork, or noticed from curators’ words, since the power of art lies in the creation process more than the final “product”.

 

 

 

Looking at the Land: The Crowdsourced, Digital Exhibition from Flak Photo’s Andy Adams

Andy Adams

He needs no introduction, but for new visitors to our site it is my pleasure to welcome back Andy Adams to Technology in the Arts. You may remember our conversation with Andy in May when we discussed the concept of Photo 2.0 and the role of Web 2.0 technologies in redefining the field of photography.

Andy’s newest success, “Looking at the Land: 21st Century American Views,” is a digital exhibition of 21st Century American Landscape photography. The exhibition, prepared in collaboration with the Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, is a discussion (both in photographs and in interviews) with eighty-eight photographers on the practice and meaning of landscape photo-making in the 21st Century. On the website, Andy discusses the current status of the exhibition, including the presentation of twenty of the photographs in physical form at the FotoWeek DC 2012 festival.

Andy and I again had the chance to discuss the themes of photography and online-presenting, but this time focused on the process of organizing a digital exhibition, his experience with crowdsourcing creativity, and his thoughts on the effects of digital projection on viewing. While my full interview with Andy will be posted here on Technology in the Arts soon, I encourage you to view the online exhibition beforehand (available for viewing below).

[embed]http://vimeo.com/49855891[/embed]

Check back in next two weeks for more of Andy’s insight on the future of photography, digital exhibitions, and crowdsourcing creativity.