Google

#TBT: Google Arts & Culture Progression

#TBT: Google Arts & Culture Progression

Google has been working on arts and culture platforms for several years now. AMT Lab has been reporting on it from the beginning. This #TBT explores the early days of the Google Arts & Culture Project and how it progressed into the app explosion earlier this year where Google used the selfie function on your phone to find artwork that looks like you.

Why Your Arts Organization Should Use Google Analytics

Why Your Arts Organization Should Use Google Analytics

Arts organizations today face a host of challenges, ranging from traditional issues like budgetary constraints and limited staff to more recent concerns, such as shifting patron demographics and increased market disruption caused by the social media frenzy. How can Google Analytics solve these problems, and more? Read Kathleen Grennan's guide here.

Research Update: Crowd-Funding through Google

Research Update: Crowd-Funding through Google

With the development of crowd-funding programs through companies such as Kickstarter, Indiegogo, and Patreon, artists have many new ways to generate both funding and visibility.  Arts and culture organizations have a harder time competing with individual artists on these platforms.  In an effort to assist these organizations as they try to change the world, Google now offers its own crowd-funding platform for nonprofit organizations: Google’s One Today.

Research Update: Google for Nonprofit Arts

Research Update: Google for Nonprofit Arts

In today’s culture, Google is seen as one of the most innovative technology companies in the world.  From its search engine to the Android operating system, Google has permeated every aspect of our techno-centric lifestyles.  Beyond the scope of their technological accomplishments, Google strives to help nonprofit organizations around the world by providing them with free online tools and access to grant monies.  Follow the development of this research here.

Solve for X

Try not to have horrible flashbacks of high school algebra! In this case, Solve for <X> is a new Google initiative, defined as “a forum to encourage and amplify technology-based moon-shot thinking and teamwork”, and <X> is defined by as the intersections of “huge problem”, “radical solution”, and “breakthrough technology”. http://youtu.be/uDDy7QSdt6A

While the website is fairly vague, Solve for <X> sounds like a hub for crowdsourced solutions with a focus on innovative thinking and technologies. The website already has some brilliant talks online – as a visual person, I found Mary Lou Jepsen’s discussion on “Imaging the Mind’s Eye” fascinating.

http://youtu.be/SjbSEjOJL3U

Solve for <X> has a Google+ page to encourage and facilitate discussion; anyone with a relevant talk is invited to share it on the page as long as it meets the criteria (huge problem, radical solution, and breakthrough technology). Solve for <X> even hosted a conference in the beginning of February to bring together innovators to discuss major problems and solutions of the modern world. There’s a YouTube channel with more videos from the site and their conference, with presumably more on the way.

Crowdsource thinking like Solve for <X> and the TED talks certainly provide an interesting set of viewpoints on a wide range of topics. You can bet we’ll be watching to see how Solve for <X> has an affect on culture and the world of art.